Staff Site

Activities

Here are some fun games, activities and crafts to offer at your library. All fit with this summer’s theme.

The full instructions for each activity provide all the details you need to run them, including space considerations, materials lists, preparation steps, and tips to make activities inclusive for kids with varying abilities. It can be helpful to ask if participants have any accessibility accommodations and to include written and visual instructions to make it easier for families to participate. For more tips, visit the Plan for Accessibility page.

There are also passive programming options with ready-to-print templates, as well as programs that can be adapted for outdoor settings. 

Click here to access activities from previous years in Dropbox 

Animal Colouring and Poetry Sheets

Craft

Ages 9-12

15-20 minutes

Animal Colouring and Poetry Sheets

Description

Colour images by Indigenous artists and write poetry

Space Considerations

Any space where participants can be seated to do a craft

Competencies

  • Artistic expression
  • Creative expression
  • Understanding and appreciation of animals
  • Written communication skills

Materials

  • Crayons, pencil crayons or markers
  • Double-sided printouts of the animal colouring and poetry sheets, with the colouring sheet on one side and the poetry prompt on the other

Implementation

1.   Print out the animal colouring and poetry sheets double-sided. You can use the sheets during a program or have them available at your library for passive programming for kids to complete at any time.

2.   During a program, you may wish to provide more context for these sheets. Consider reading this passage from The Learning Circle: Classroom Activities on First Nations in Canada.

“Crucial to the traditional world view of many First Nations is their belief that human beings are connected in the circle of life with all other species, and that each species has its own set of special knowledge and skills enabling it to live in the world. In some First Nations legends, the skills and knowledge of human beings did not compare to those of the animals—humans could never possess the strength of a bear, the speed of deer, the intelligence of a wolf or the sight of an eagle.”

Accessibility Considerations

  • Offer kids a variety of instruments to colour their image, and encourage them to choose what they feel most comfortable with
  • Give kids the chance to recite their poems verbally if desired, rather than writing them down
  • If available, offer participants an accessible computer space (equipped with screen-reading and screen-enlargement features) with a mouse and a larger screen, so they can write their poem on the computer instead of writing it down on paper

Book Suggestions

Magical Beings of Haida Gwaii by Terri-Lynn Williams-Davidson, Sara Florence Davidson, Alyssa Koski and Judy Hilgemann

Meet Your Family = Gikenim Giniigi'igoog by David Bouchard and Kristy Cameron

On the Trapline by David A. Robertson and Julie Flett

Full Activity PDF

Animal colouring and poetry sheets

First Nations Health and Wellness Colouring Book

Build a Castle

Long Activity

Ages 6-8

30 minutes

Build a Castle

Description

Build a castle using a variety of materials

Space Considerations

An indoor space with tables and chairs where participants can be seated to work on their castles

Competencies

  • Creative and imaginative thinking
  • Engineering
  • Organization and planning

Materials

  • Building materials: Cardboard boxes or cardboard pieces, shoeboxes, paper rolls and/or building blocks
  • Scissors
  • String
  • Pencils or pens
  • Markers
  • Tape
  • Glue
  • Paper
  • Toothpicks, popsicle sticks or wooden dowels
  • Paintbrushes and paint (optional)

Preparation

  • Prepare the room for a program that uses glue or paint
  • Borrow library books with various images of castles, and have them on display for the program to serve as inspiration

Implementation

It is recommended that participants work in groups for this activity, as it can be quite labour-intensive.

1.   Groups can plan their castle designs by drawing, on paper, elements that they want to include in their castles. They can review images online or in books, including non-fiction books, for ideas.

2.   Here are six elements that participants can consider for their castles:

a.    Battlements

Castles often contain battlements at the tops of the walls, with a crenellated pattern so those inside can shoot with bows and arrows, guns and/or cannons (picture a).

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b.    Turret

A turret is a small tower that projects vertically from the wall of the castle. Cut out a crenellated pattern at the top of a cardboard roll. Cut a slit from the bottom of the roll to match the height of the castle wall (picture b). Turn the roll around, and cut a similar slit on the opposite side (picture c). Then slide the slits of the tower over the castle wall (picture d). You can add as many turrets and vary the heights as desired.

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c.    Spire

You may wish to add a pointed end or spire to the top of your turret rather than the crenellated pattern. To make a small cone to add to the top of the tower, cut a circle out of paper and cut out a triangle wedge from the circle (picture e). Then roll it into a cone shape, and affix the overlap with tape (picture f). Place it on top of the turret, and affix it with glue or tape (picture g).

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d.    Flags

Many castles have flags. Use a toothpick, popsicle stick or wooden dowel, and affix a small paper flag to your castle (picture h).

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e.    Drawbridge

A drawbridge is a type of movable bridge that can be raised and lowered, typically at the entrance of a castle. Below are the steps for creating a simple drawbridge, but participants can experiment with other methods.

Draw the outline of a door frame on the front wall of your castle, and cut it out. Make a hole on both sides of the top of the drawbridge door, using a sharp pencil or pen (picture i). Punch two holes in the walls of the castle, near the door holes (picture j). Place the door down flat, and cut two pieces of string the approximate length of the holes in the castle walls to the door holes (picture k). Thread the string through each of the holes, and tie knots on the back end (picture l). Now your drawbridge can be raised and lowered as you pull on the strings from the castle wall (picture m).

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f.    Moat

A moat is a ditch surrounding a castle, typically filled with water and intended as a defence against attack.

Use a large piece of cardboard for the base of the castle. Trace the castle base on the cardboard. Draw a surrounding moat larger than the castle base. Paint the moat of the castle blue, or use markers. You can paint or use markers to colour the castle base and some green grass if desired (picture n).

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3.   After creating all of the walls for the castle, tape them together to form a square or rectangle. Decorate with markers and/or paint.

Accessibility Considerations

  • Kids should be encouraged to work in teams for this one, as it is quite labour-intensive
  • Not all participants on the team have to build; for example, some participants can inform the design and help to troubleshoot
  • Offer a variety of building materials
  • Assist participants with cutting and gluing as needed, especially for the cardboard
  • Offer easy-grip scissors

Book Suggestions

Jonathan and the Giant Eagle by Danny Christopher

Journey of the Midnight Sun by Shazia Afzal and Aliya Ghare

Once Upon a Dragon's Fire by Beatrice Blue

Full Activity PDF

Button Moon Collage

Craft

Ages 6-8

30-60 minutes

Button Moon Collage

Description

Participants will create a button moon collage as a decoration that can be hung on a window or wall

Note: This craft can be printed on 8.5” x 11” paper and cut into half sheets. Half sheets are recommended because completing a full sheet would require a large quantity of materials.

Space Considerations

Any indoor space where participants can do crafts at tables and chairs

Competencies

  • Development of fine motor skills
  • Eye-hand coordination
  • Following directions
  • Spatial relationships
  • Understanding shapes

Materials

  • Black or dark blue card stock (for preparation)
  • Transparent packing tape
  • Wet glue or tape
  • Scissors
  • Pencils
  • Many buttons and beads of various sizes (white, creamy, golden, yellow, mint, light-blue, etc.)
  • Rhinestone stickers and/or jewel stickers (recommended, but optional)
  • Small white beads (optional)
  • Star stickers (optional)
  • Paper-punched stars (optional)

Preparation

  • Print moon template on card stock; it might show up quite dark on card stock, so you can go over the outline with pencil or wet glue
    o The wet glue will also provide a tactile outline
  • Provide half sheets of plain black card stock if participants prefer to draw their own crescent moon
    o Remind them that it has to be big enough to cut out with scissors, and that the bigger the space, the more material will be needed to fill it up

Implementation

1. Go over template outline again using pencil if needed.

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2. Cut the moon out by poking scissors through it and then cutting from the inside.

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3. Tape the reverse side of the paper using strips of packing tape. The tape strips should overlap a little bit so there are no gaps.

Make sure that you are using a smooth surface underneath while taping, and that the tape will not damage it (i.e. the tape will not take paint off a table).

If you want the moon facing left in the completed piece, turn the paper over. If you want the moon facing right, do not turn the paper over. In the example below, the paper is turned over, so the moon will face left once it is completed.

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4. Only the surface of the moon has to be taped over, so there is no need to tape the entire sheet of paper.

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5. Turn the card stock over. Add buttons, beads, and stickers and other materials within the moon’s outline to the sticky side of the moon. Do not worry if you leave small spaces uncovered.

The images below are examples of completed moon collages.

Version 1: Mostly buttons with some rhinestone stickers and jewel stickers

Version 2: Mostly rhinestone stickers and jewel stickers with some buttons

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7. You can hang the collage on a window, and you can also decorate the background with stickers, as in the examples below.

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Accessibility Considerations

  • Give participants the option to use a stencil or draw their own moon
  • Prepare pre-cut templates that have the moon cut out and the packing tape already applied
  • Be ready to assist participants with taping
  • Star stickers, other stickers or paper-punched stars can be used to decorate, instead of cutting out stars
  • Have a good selection of large and medium buttons
  • Place small beads in a cup, bowl or container with a small spoon, so kids can pour beads on the moon and do not need to pick up each bead and place it.

Book Suggestions

Meet Your Family = Gikenim Giniigi'igoog by David Bouchard and Kristy Cameron

Moon Pops by Heena Baek

The Origin of Day and Night by Paula Ikuutaq Rumbolt and Lenny Lishchenko

Window by Marion Arbona

Images

  • Examples of completed moon collages and template

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Button moon collage instructions PDF

Button moon collage template: moon template.docx (2 half sheets per page)

Button moon collage examples: moon collage examples.docx

Full activity PDF

Coding Fairy Tale Mazes

Long Activity

Ages 9-12

30 minutes

Coding Fairy Tale Mazes

Description

Learn the basics of coding language while manoeuvring a character through various mazes inspired by fairy tales. Participants can also try out their new coding skills on a computer or tablet.

Space Considerations

Participants will need access to tables and enough space to spread out the coding printouts. If the computer-coding portion of this activity is included, all participants will also need access to a computer or tablet (individually or shared in small groups).

Competencies

  • Computer literacy
  • Logic and sequencing
  • Problem solving
  • Understanding cause-and-effect relationships

Materials

  • Paper for printing fairy-tale maze templates
  • Paper for printing coding commands
  • Computers or tablets (optional)
  • Scissors (staff use only)
  • Characters (small toys or figurines similar in size to a LEGO minifigure), or paper printouts of small characters (one per participant)
  • Pencils

Preparation

  • Print several copies of the coding commands, about one copy for every two participants
  • Separate all of the coding commands by cutting them with scissors
  • Print the fairy-tales mazes, one set for each participant

Implementation

Maze 1

1.   Hand out Maze 1

a.    Introduce the concept of “sequence”:

i.    Code must be written in a specific order called a sequence

ii.    Just like a story would not make sense if the sentences were rearranged in the wrong order, code will not work if it is written in the wrong sequence

b.    Hand out the following pre-cut coding instructions: Go Forward, Turn Right, Turn Left, End

c.    Participants need to create a long list of the instructions that they think the character needs to follow to reach the end of the maze

d.    The character must avoid the obstacles and dead ends, and must stay on the white squares

e.    Once participants have organized their list from top (first command) to bottom (final command, or End), place the character on the start square

f.     Another participant, staff or a caregiver can check the code by moving the character and following the instructions in the list

i.    Flip over each command as it is completed

ii.    Participants can make corrections as needed; young children often need corrections on left and right turns, as they must think about the turns from the character’s perspective

Maze 2

1.   Hand out Maze 2

a.    We are still working with the same coding commands (Go Forward, Turn Right, Turn Left, End), but now our character must pick up a basket of treats before making their way to the end of the maze; they must get the basket, turn around (hint: two left or right turns in a row will have the character facing the opposite, correct direction), and then make their way to the end of the maze, avoiding the obstacles on the way

b.    Once participants have organized their list from top (first command) to bottom (final command), place the character on the start square

c.    Another participant, staff or a caregiver can check the code by moving the character and following the instructions in the list

i.    Flip over each command as it is completed

ii.    Participants can make corrections as needed

Maze 3

1.   Hand out Maze 3

a.    Introduce the concept of “loops”:

i.    This is when you want to repeat steps in a sequence

ii.    Rather than piecing together three separate “move forward” commands, participants can learn to use the code “for ___ steps, move forward,” filling in the blank space with the amount of steps needed

b.    Hand out a pencil and the following pre-cut coding instructions: Go Forward, Turn Right, Turn Left, For ___ Steps, End

c.    Participants need to create a long list of the instructions that they think the character needs to reach the end of the maze

i.    It is a good habit to start indenting the line of code underneath the loops; this is required by some computer-coding languages, and it also makes the language much more readable

d.    Once participants have organized their list from top (first command) to bottom (final command), place the character on the start square

e.    Another participant, staff or a caregiver can check the code by moving the character and following the instructions in the list

i.    Flip over each command as it is completed

ii.    Participants can make corrections as needed

Maze 4

1.   Hand out Maze 4

a.    We are using the same commands as Maze 3 (Go Forward, Turn Right, Turn Left, For ___ Steps, End), but now while our character needs to pick up a basket of treats before making their way to the end of the maze, they must avoid obstacles to go and get the basket, turn around (hint: two left or right turns in a row will have the character facing the opposite, correct direction), and then make their way to the end of the maze

b.    Once participants have organized their list from top (first command) to bottom (final command), place the character at the start box

c.    Another participant, staff or a caregiver can check the code by moving the character and following the instructions in the list

i.    Flip over each command as it is completed

ii.    Participants can make corrections as needed

If you have access to computers or tablets for the program, or if you would like to encourage participants to practice their coding after the program, try out the excellent coding website Run Marco, a free online game that builds coding skills

Accessibility Considerations

  • We have included a variety of levels for the mazes (fewer coding commands needed)
  • Read out and explain all of the coding commands for the participants before the program
  • On the Hour of Code website, there is an option for participants to see the instructions in larger font as well as to have the instructions read out to them; see the top-right corner of the screen for these options
  • If available, offer participants an accessible computer space with a mouse and a larger screen; if using a tablet, instruct participants how they can adjust the zoom of the screen if possible
  • There are a number of free, accessible websites that participants may also check out:
    o    Code.org
    o    Code Monster
    o    Scratch

Book Suggestions

The Book of Mythical Beasts and Magical Creatures by Stephen Krensky and Pham Quang Phuc

This Is the Path the Wolf Took by Laura Farina and Elina Ellis

Full Activity PDF

Fairy tale mazes

Coding commands

Colouring Pages

Short Activity

Ages 3-5

20 minutes

Colouring Pages

Description

Colour the illustrations by Rob Justus

Space Considerations

Any type of space where children can be seated to colour

Competencies

  • Creative expression
  • Development of fine motor skills

Materials

  • Colouring pages
  • Crayons, pencil crayons or markers

Implementation

  1. Distribute the colouring pages and crayons to participants
  2. This activity can be run as a passive program, where you print the images and allow kids to colour them anywhere in the library, at any time of day

Accessibility Considerations

  • Offer kids a variety of instruments to colour their image, and encourage them to choose what they feel most comfortable with

Book Suggestions

I Am Scary by Elise Gravel

Unicorns 101 by Cale Atkinson

You Might Be Special! by Kerri Kokias and Marcus Cutler

Full Activity PDF

Colouring Page - All Pages

Colouring Page- Cyclops

Colouring Page - Dragon

Colouring Page - Library

Colouring Page - Party

Colouring Page - Singing

Colouring Page - Reading

Colours and Shapes Booklet

Short Activity

Ages 0-3

15 minutes

Colours and Shapes Booklet

Description

Participants create and colour their own small booklet

Space Considerations

Any type of space where participants can be seated to do a craft

Competencies

  • Development of fine motor skills
  • Following directions
  • Understanding shapes

Materials

  • Crayons, pencil crayons or markers: purple, green, orange, blue, yellow and red
  • Stapler (adult use only)
  • Paper
  • Coloured paper (optional)

Implementation

1. Distribute printouts of the Colours and shapes booklet. If desired, you can use a coloured piece of paper for the cover page.

2. Fold the cover page.

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3. Fold each of the shape pages and stack them. Place the open-ended side of the pages inside the cover. The closed end of the pages should be facing out. This helps make the book sturdier. Close the book.

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4. With caregiver or staff assistance as needed, staple the edge of the cover as many times as needed to secure the inner pages in place.

5. Encourage children to colour the shapes on each of the pages by matching the text to the colour needed.

Accessibility Considerations

  • Offer participants a variety of instruments to colour their image, and encourage them to choose what they feel most comfortable with

Book Suggestions

Animals in the Sky by Sara Gillingham

Come, Read with Me by Margriet Ruurs and Christine Wei

I Am Scary by Elise Gravel

Colours and shapes booklet

Full Activity PDF

Country Mouse, City Mouse

Craft

Ages 0-3

20 minutes

Country Mouse, City Mouse

Description

Create a country mouse or a city mouse

Space Considerations

Any type of space where participants can be seated to do a craft

Competencies

  • Development of fine motor skills
  • Following directions
  • Understanding shapes

Materials

  • Printouts of the mouse templates (coloured paper optional)
  • Crayons, pencil crayons or markers
  • Scissors (adult use only)
  • Glue
  • Tape (optional)
  • Cotton or tissue paper for stuffing (optional)
  • Yarn (any colour), cut into 8 cm pieces (three per participant)
  • Pompoms, one per participant (any colour)
  • Stapler (adult use only) (optional)

Preparation

  • If desired, cut out all templates before the program. Alternatively, allow parents and caregivers to assist with this step.
  • Prepare the room for a program that uses glue.

Implementation

1. Distribute mouse templates to kids. A full package of templates includes one face, two inner ears, two outer ears, two eyes and one hat. If desired, you can have multiple colours of the templates available and allow kids to choose.

2. Distribute all the craft materials: crayons, pencil crayons or markers; glue; tape (optional); cotton or tissue paper (optional); three 8 cm pieces of yarn; pompom; scissors (adult use only); stapler (adult use only) (optional).

3. Start with the face template: cut around the outer border of the face template, or have these pre-cut before the program.

4. To create the face, fold template forward along the dotted lines so the bottom of the paper comes to a point. Secure the paper with tape (or staples) at the back where it overlaps.

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5. Optional: stuff the pocket of the folded paper with a bit of cotton or tissue paper for a 3-D effect, and add a bit of tape to secure it in place.

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6. Glue each of the inner ears to the outer ears.

7. On the front side of the mouse face (the side without tape), add the eyes and the ears using glue.

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8. Tape (or staple) the three pieces of yarn to the back of the mouse at the bottom horizontally and diagonally for whiskers.

9. Add the pompom for the nose at the bottom using glue.

10. Glue a country hat or a city hat to the top of the mouse and decorate it in any way you see fit!

Accessibility Considerations

  • Offer pre-cut templates
  • Offer assistance with cutting and gluing as needed
  • Offer kids a variety of instruments to colour their image, and encourage them to choose what they feel most comfortable with
  • Offer larger glue sticks
  • Offer buttons, stick-on googly eyes, or 3-D stickers for eyes to give the craft some tactile elements

Book Suggestions

Come, Read with Me by Margriet Ruurs and Christine Wei

Read to Your Toddler Every Day: 20 Folktales to Read Aloud by Lucy Brownridge and Chloe Giordano

Images

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Mouse templates

Full activity PDF

Crown and Tiara Craft

Craft

Ages 0-3

15-20 minutes

Crown and Tiara Craft

Description

Create your own crown or tiara

Space Considerations

Any type of space where participants can be seated to do a craft

Competencies

  • Artistic expression
  • Development of fine motor skills
  • Understanding shapes

Materials

  • Printouts of the crown and tiara template
  • Crayons, pencil crayons or markers
  • Cut-outs of various shapes on construction paper of different colours (for decoration) (optional)
  • Foam shapes or other tactile items (pompons, stickers, pipe cleaners, etc.) (optional)
  • Glitter (optional)
  • Scissors (adult use only)
  • Glue or tape

Preparation

  • Prepare the room for a program that uses glue (unless tape is used instead).
  • Pre-cut crowns and tiaras if desired. Alternatively, allow caregivers to assist with this step during the program.

Implementation

1. Allow participants to choose either a crown or tiara template.

2. The templates can either be pre-cut by staff, or you can distribute scissors to caregivers to cut around the templates.

3. Distribute decorative items along with crayons, pencil crayons or markers, and glue or tape.

4. Participants decorate their crown or tiara with assistance from caregivers and staff as needed. It is not necessary to decorate the straight bands of the template.

5. Once the main piece is decorated and dry (if glue is used), glue or tape one straight band behind the left edge of the main crown or tiara and the other band behind the right edge. Depending on the size of the child’s head, only one band may be necessary, which can be affixed to both edges.

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6. Connect the bands at the back of the child’s head, using your finger to hold the bands together in a position that feels snug. Then use glue or tape to secure the bands together.

Accessibility Considerations

  • Offer kids a variety of instruments to colour their crown or tiara, and encourage them to choose what they feel most comfortable with
  • Have a variety of material on hand for kids of different abilities to choose from; include a variety of sizes for the shape cut-outs
  • Pre-cut the templates and the shapes, or offer easy-grip scissors to all participants

Book Suggestions

Princesses Versus Dinosaurs by Linda Bailey and Joy Ang

Read to Your Toddler Every Day: 20 Folktales to Read Aloud by Lucy Brownridge and Chloe Giordano

The Amazing Zoe: A Queen Like Me! by Valene Campbell and Arooba Bilal

You Might Be Special! by Kerri Kokias and Marcus Cutler

Images

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Crown and tiara template

Full activity PDF

Dinosaur Egg

Craft

Ages 0-3

10 minutes

Dinosaur Egg

Description

A colouring and folding craft to create a dinosaur hatching from an egg

Space Considerations

Any type of space where participants can be seated to do a craft

Competencies

  • Artistic expression
  • Development of fine motor skills
  • Understanding and appreciation of animals

Materials

  • Scissors (adult use only)
  • Crayons, pencil crayons or markers

Implementation

  1. Print and distribute the dinosaur egg template to each participant
  2. Distribute crayons, pencil crayons or markers
  3. Encourage participants to colour the dinosaur and the egg
  4. Caregivers cut along the solid outside border of the template
  5. Fold backwards along the dotted lines near the top and bottom of the template and then unfold
  6. Fold around the middle so the bottom dotted line meets the top dotted line to close the egg
  7. Participants can unfold (and re-fold) the template to reveal the dinosaur hatching from the egg

Accessibility Considerations

  • Offer participants a variety of instruments to colour their image, and encourage them to choose what they feel most comfortable with
  • Offer assistance with folding

Book Suggestions

Princesses Versus Dinosaurs by Linda Bailey and Joy Ang

The Dragon Who Didn't Like Fire by Gemma Merino

The Egg by Geraldo Valério

Images

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Dinosaur template

Full Activity PDF

Fairy Tale Action Game

Short Activity

Ages 3-5

20-30 minutes

Fairy Tale Action Game

Description

In this game, role-playing cards will be given to the players. Each card will have a fairy tale and an action assigned to it, which the player must act out.

The three stories available are:

  • Goldilocks and the Three Bears (eight cards)
  • The Gingerbread Man (four cards)
  • The Tortoise and the Hare (four cards)

Space Considerations

Any large space free of obstacles where kids can move around

Competencies

  • Body awareness
  • Creative expression
  • Following directions
  • Oral communication skills
  • Reading comprehension

Materials

  • Fairy tale action game cards

Preparation

  • Print out several copies of fairy tale action game cards on card stock and cut them out
  • A PDF with blank fairy tale action game cards is also available for customization

Implementation

How to Play:

Option #1: Large group play

  • One player is assigned as the narrator and reads the cards aloud, while the rest of the players follow the actions as a group

Option #2: Small group play

  1. One player is assigned as the narrator, and the rest of the players are each given a card to act out
  2. If they wish, players may read their cards aloud to the group to share ideas of what actions to use
  3. When ready, players return their cards to the narrator to read out
  4. As each card is read out by the narrator, the players take turns coming forward to act out the assigned card
  5. If there are multiple groups, they may also trade or share stories once completed

Option #3: Performance play

  1. Players are divided into small groups
  2. One player is assigned as the narrator, and the rest of the players are each given a card to act out
  3. The acting players stand in the order of their cards
  4. The first time they perform for the other groups (repeating each action twice without narration) in the order of their card, and the audience tries to guess the story
  5. The players will not confirm if guesses are correct
  6. The second time the narrator participates and therefore reveals the answers, as the players act out their roles again

Accessibility Considerations

  • Cards have been formatted to fit 8.5 x 11 paper to accommodate larger print (16 pt, 20 pt)
  • A player with a disability may:

* be assigned the narrator role

* have someone read the card to them

* show and/or read the card aloud instead of doing the actions

* read the card aloud while a partner does the actions

Book Suggestions

GoldiBooks and the Wee Bear by Troy Wilson and Edwardian Taylor

Redlocks and the Three Bears by Claudia Rueda

The Fabled Life of Aesop by Ian Lendler and Pamela Zagarenski

Whatever After: Good as Gold by Sarah Mlynowski

Images

  • The Gingerbread Man action game cards
  • Blank fairy tale action game cards

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Goldilocks and the Three Bears action cards PDF (eight cards, two pages)

The Gingerbread Man action cards PDF (four cards)

The Tortoise and the Hare action cards PDF (four cards)

Blank fairy tale action game card template DOCX (eight cards, two pages)

Full activity PDF

Fairy Tale Bingo

Short Activity

Ages 6-8

15-25 minutes

Fairy Tale Bingo

Description

Try your luck in this interactive picture bingo

Number of Participants

There are 30 unique bingo cards; if you print these cards more than once for larger groups, participants with duplicate cards will get bingos at the same time

Space Considerations

Indoor space with tables and chairs for all participants

Competencies

  • Following directions
  • Social interaction

Materials

  • Bingo cards printed, preferably in colour, on card stock or regular paper (if desired, you can laminate the cards for extra durability, especially if using them for multiple programs)
  • Word list (first page of bingo card file)
  • Small paper scraps (no bigger than each bingo square) or small tokens
  • Container for word cut-outs
  • Prizes (optional)
  • Number templates to identify winning order
  • Scissors (adult use only)
  • Pencils or crayons
  • Microphone if necessary
  • White board or computer-display screen

Preparation

  • Print the word list (the first page of the bingo card file), cut the words out and place them in a container
  • Cut paper scraps or purchase tokens for participants to cover the called-out words on their cards
  • If giving prizes, each prize should be fairly equal in value, and there should be plenty of selection and duplicates to ensure that all participants are happy after the program is done

Implementation

  1. Hand out one bingo card to each participant as they enter the program.
  2. Shake the container with the list of words, and pull out one strip at a time.
  3. Each time, call out the letter (B, I, N, G or O) and the character on the slip. The letter indicates which column the participants should look down; the character will appear in that column only.
  4. Repeat the call-out to ensure that everyone is able to hear you clearly. For a large space or many participants, use a microphone if necessary.
  5. Participants look at their cards and place a paper scrap or token on top of the character that has been called out. The called-out characters should remain covered for the full duration of the game.
  6. The first participant to get five in a row horizontally, diagonally or vertically should shout out BINGO!
  7. It is optional to offer prizes for this program; the first player to get a bingo could receive the first prize. If using prizes, it is important that all children receive a prize in the program, not just one winner. (See step 10 for the prize-numbering system.)
  8. After the first one-line bingo, a recommended way to play would be to simply continue the game with all participants attempting to get a full card (all 25 words covered), rather than a full line.
  9. The first player to get a full card should shout out BINGO!
  10. This participant could then select a prize or, depending on the number of participants, could be given a printed number 2 and would be the second in line during the prize selection after the first prize winner, who could be given a printed number 1.
  11. The game continues until every participant gets a full card (i.e. bingo) and receives either a prize or a number in line to select a prize.
  12. If using the prize-numbering system, participants would line up in the order they obtained their full-card bingo, to select from a variety of prizes.
  13. It is possible that many participants will get bingo at the same time as the game progresses; generally, a fair way to assign prize-selection order in these cases is to allow younger players to select prizes before older players.

Accessibility Considerations

  • Offer options to cover called-out squares, such as large tokens to place on top of the square, or a writing instrument to draw an X over the square
  • Read out and display (for example, on a white board or computer-display screen) everything that is being called out; you may need multiple staff in the room for this
  • Repeat call-outs
  • For a large space or many participants, use a microphone if necessary
  • One staff member can be assigned to walk around the room and assist as needed
  • If distributing prizes, ensure that all participants receive a prize
  • Use 3-D stickers that represent the characters in the card squares

Book Suggestions

Magical Beings of Haida Gwaii by Terri-Lynn Williams-Davidson, Sara Florence Davidson, Alyssa Koski and Judy Hilgemann

Myths and Legends of the World by Alli Brydon and Julia Iredale

The Fabled Life of Aesop by Ian Lendler and Pamela Zagarenski

Bingo cards and word list

Number template for prize distribution

Full Activity PDF

Frog Prince Party Blower

Craft

Ages 6-8

20 minutes

Frog Prince Party Blower

Description

Create a craft of a frog with a party blower for a tongue

Space Considerations

Any space where participants can be seated to do a craft

Competencies

  • Artistic expression
  • Development of fine motor skills
  • Engineering

Materials

  • Paper plates (one per participant)
  • Paint (red and green)
  • Paintbrushes
  • Crayons, pencil crayons or markers
  • White pompoms, stick-on eyes or googly eyes (optional)
  • Construction paper: green and red (optional)
  • Frog legs and arms templates printed on green paper (four per participant)
  • Glue
  • Scissors (adult use only)
  • Party blowers
  • Tape

Preparation

  • Prepare the room for a program that uses paint (substitutions for paint provided below)
  • Pre-cut frog legs and arms if desired
  • Purchase party blowers from a local dollar store

Implementation

1.   Distribute a paper plate to each participant.

2.   If using paint: Paint the bottom of the plate green and let it dry. Paint the top of the plate red and let it dry. It may be a good idea to read a few stories while the paint is drying!

  • There are many options if you want substitutions for paint. Kids can colour the plate using crayons, pencil crayons or markers. Alternatively, you can cut red coloured paper to size and glue it to the inside of the plate, and do the same with green coloured paper for the outside of the plate.

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3.   Fold the plate in half so the green is on the outside and the red is on the inside, forming the mouth of the frog.

4.   Glue on two legs and two arms.

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5.   Optional: Glue on two eyes, using white pompoms, stick-on eyes or googly eyes.

6.   Adults (staff, parents or caregivers) use scissors to create a small slit in the back of the folded plate, at the centre.

7.   Push a party blower through the slit so the mouthpiece (where you blow) sticks out of the back, and the curled part forms the tongue. If desired, add a bit of tape to help secure the party blower in place.

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8.   Surprise someone you know by blowing on the party blower!

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Accessibility Considerations

  • Pre-cut the hole in each of the paper plates before distributing them
  • Offer kids a variety of instruments to colour their image, and encourage them to choose what they feel most comfortable with
  • Offer large stick-on eyes for the frog, or allow participants to draw their own
  • Pre-cut the frog legs and arms
  • Offer assistance with gluing as needed, and with inserting or affixing the party blower
  • Offer large glue sticks

Book Suggestions

Brothers Grimm: The Most Beloved Fairy Tales by Jacob Grimm, Wilhelm Grimm and Manuela Adreani

The Fabled Life of Aesop by Ian Lendler and Pamela Zagarenski

Treasury of Magical Tales from Around the World by Donna Jo Napoli and Christina Balit

Full Activity PDF

Frog legs and arms

I Spy and Count: Treasure Hunt

Short Activity

Ages 0-6

10 minutes

I Spy and Count: Treasure Hunt

Description

Printable worksheets with items from a treasure that children search for and count

Space Considerations

Indoor space where participants can complete a worksheet

Competencies

  • Classification skills
  • Following directions
  • Organization and planning

Materials

Implementation

  1. Print out and distribute an easy, medium or hard version of the I Spy and Count worksheets, based on the age group of your participants. Very young children can complete a worksheet with caregiver or staff assistance as needed.
  2. Distribute a writing instrument to all participants.
  3. Encourage participants to count each image and record the totals in the boxes at the bottom of the worksheet.
  4. You may consider printing the worksheets to have the sheets available for kids as a passive activity outside of a scheduled program.

Accessibility Considerations

  • Consider running an alternative activity called I Sort and Count for kids with low or no vision:
    o   Pre-cut a series of shapes on card stock, or purchase foam shapes from a local dollar or craft store
    o   Hand out the shapes to participants in a zipper storage bag or a paper bag
    o   Participants can sort and then count each of the shapes with caregiver or staff assistance as needed
  • Three different sheets are provided, so you can allow participants to choose the sheet that is the most suitable challenge for them

Book Suggestions

Come, Read with Me by Margriet Ruurs and Christine Wei

This Is the Path the Wolf Took by Laura Farina and Elina Ellis

You Might Be Special! by Kerri Kokias and Marcus Cutler

I Spy and Count: Easy Version

I Spy and Count: Medium Version

I Spy and Count: Hard Version

Full Activity PDF

Images and Templates

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Jack and the Beanstalk: STEM Planting Activity

Short Activity

Ages 3-5

20- minutes

Jack and the Beanstalk: STEM Planting Activity

Description

Participants will plant a bean seed in a cup full of soil. They will decorate and add a castle. Eventually, the seed will grow into a plant that reaches the castle. 

Space Considerations

Any type of space where participants can be seated to do a craft

Competencies

  • Creative expression
  • Development of fine motor skills
  • Following directions
  • Sensory motor skills
  • Study of nature

Materials

  • Card stock or printer paper
  • Medium or large paper or plastic cups, or medium or large-sized flowerpots
  • Planting soil
  • Bean seeds
  • Wooden dowel or large craft stick
  • Tape
  • Glue sticks
  • Scissors (optional; adult use only)
  • Castle template
  • Pencil crayons, crayons or markers
  • Medium or large cotton balls or cotton pads (optional)
  • Foam shapes or stickers (optional)

Optional Materials

Flowerpot decorations:

  • Air dry clay
  • Paint
  • Paintbrushes
  • Googly eyes
  • Foam shapes
  • Flower or bug stickers
  • Shape punches

Castle decorations:

  • Large cotton balls or large white/blue/grey/pink/purple pompoms

Preparation

  • Prepare the room for a program that uses glue and paint
  • Cover tables and floor with newspapers to catch soil and other materials
  • Print out castle templates on card stock or paper
  • Pre-cut framed castles
  • Pre-fill cups with soil (optional)

Implementation

Planting the seed

  1. Fill a cup with soil, leaving some space at the top of the cup.

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2. Plant two bean seeds in the soil by using your finger to make a hole in the soil, put the seeds in the holes, then cover them with soil. Make sure to spread them out near the centre of the cup, and do not plant them too deeply in the cup.

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3. Water until damp but not soaked.

Adding the castle

  1. Colour the castle.

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2. Cotton balls can be added on the bottom of the castle using glue or rolled pieces of tape; cotton pads may also be used, but they may require cutting with scissors (optional).

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3. Tape the castle to a long wooden dowel or craft stick.

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4. Put the dowel or craft stick into the soil beside the seeds.

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5. Water the plant daily until the soil is damp, and give it lots of sunlight.

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Plant care

  1. Can be grown at the library near a window, or kids can take home as soon as possible
  2. Leave on a windowsill to get lots of sunlight
  3. Water until damp but not soaked
  4. Check every day, and add water as needed to keep the soil damp

Optional: Decorating the flowerpot

  1. Use medium- and large-sized flowerpots
  2. Can use a paper or plastic cup so the clay can be formed around it
  3. Can provide air dry clay for kids to use
  4. Use more clay to transform the cup into the shapes of animals or fantastical creatures
  5. Can add googly eyes
  6. Flowerpots can be painted as well (optional)

Accessibility Considerations

  • Use larger cups
  • Use thicker wooden dowel or large craft stick
  • Use large cotton balls or large white/blue/grey/pink/purple pompoms
  • Castle does not need to be cut out, or it can be framed in a rectangle to make it easier to cut out
  • Use foam flowers or bug stickers to decorate the pot
  • Pre-fill cups with soil
  • Pre-cut framed castle

Book Suggestions

Bold Tales of Brave-Hearted Boys by Susannah McFarlane, Brenton McKenna, Simon Howe, Matt Huynh and Louie Joyce

Forgotten Fairy Tales of Kindness and Courage by Mary Sebag-Montefiore, Josy Bloggs, Maribel Luchuga, Maxine Lee-Mackie and Khoa Le

Images

  • Castle Templates

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Jack and the Beanstalk: Planting Activity Instructions PDF (4 pages)

Jack and the Beanstalk castle templates DOCX (8.5” x 11”, four castles per page)

Full activity PDF

Let's Make Comics

Long Activity

Ages 9-12

30-60 minutes

Let's Make Comics

Description

Create a character by drawing them and creating their profile. Make a three-panel Post-it comic by adding your created character or do something entirely new. Caption drawings by Rob Justus. Then work on the Finish this Comic worksheet or take it home.

Space Considerations

Any type of space where participants can be seated to do a craft

Competencies

  • Artistic expression
  • Creative and imaginative thinking
  • Creative expression
  • Emotional expression

Materials

  • Pencils
  • Erasers
  • Pencil crayons or markers
  • Large Post-it notes, or paper squares or rectangles (optional)
  • Tape (optional)

Preparation

  • Print desired templates

Implementation

  • Distribute handouts
  • Distribute pencils, erasers, and pencil crayons or markers
  • Support participants as they draw and write

Accessibility Considerations

  • Use the larger handouts (8.5” x 14”)
  • Provide larger Post-it notes or cut-out squares or rectangles
  • Consider a group approach for creating a character and captioning drawings by Rob Justus
  • Kids may partner up for writing and illustrating comics

Book Suggestions

Death & Sparkles by Rob Justus

ParaNorthern and the Chaos Bunny A-hop-calypse by Stephanie Cooke and Mari Costa

The Lunch Club: The Curse of the Scarewolf by Dom Pelletier

Images

  • A sample of activity handouts

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Create Your Own Character: Ideas for Facial Features DOCX (8.5” x 11”, portrait)

Create Your Own Character: profile page DOCX (8.5” x 11”, portrait)

Create Your Own Character: profile page DOCX (8.5” x 14”, portrait)

Post-it Comics template: option to print in colour or use actual Post-its or cut out squares or rectangles instead DOCX (8.5” x 11”, landscape)

Finish this Comic DOCX (8.5” x 11”, landscape)

Caption these Rob Justus Drawings DOCX (3 pages, 8.5” x 11”, landscape)

Full activity PDF

Mythical Creature Quiz

Long Activity

Ages 9-12

45-60 minutes

Mythical Creature Quiz

Description

Using a PowerPoint presentation and handouts, kids will try to guess the mythical creatures. Clues for each creature will include geographical location, description and image.

Selected creatures are: dragon, unicorn, bigfoot/sasquatch, kraken, dirawong, qalupalik, dokkaebi, ymir, ninki nanka and siren.

We encourage you to incorporate The Book of Mythical Beasts and Magical Creatures by Stephen Krensky and Pham Quang Phuc in your program by reading a few short excerpts after the presentation (if you have time) to get kids interested in learning about mythical creatures.

Space Considerations

Any space indoors where a PowerPoint presentation can be set up for participants

Competencies

  • Following directions
  • Memory
  • Reading comprehension
  • Understanding and appreciation of animals
  • Vocabulary building

Materials

  • Mythical Beast Quiz participant quiz sheets
  • Mythical Beast Quiz PowerPoint presentation
  • Pencils with erasers

Preparation

  • Test the Mythical Beast Quiz PowerPoint presentation at some time before your actual program
  • Print the Mythical Beast Quiz participant quiz sheets

Implementation

  • Set up the PowerPoint presentation
  • Explain the program and the types of clues they will be given
  • Play the presentation
  • Read some excerpts from The Book of Mythical Beasts and Magical Creatures by Stephen Krensky and Pham Quang Phuc (optional)

Accessibility Considerations

  • Read clues and multiple-choice answers aloud twice
  • Describe the image once the correct answer has been revealed
  • Provide materials about mythical creatures for different reading levels and varying formats
  • Do not rush through the program; if time is running out, just do a few questions and encourage kids to learn more about mythical creatures

Book Suggestions

A Royal Guide to Monster Slaying by Kelley Armstrong and Xavière Daumarie

The Book of Mythical Beasts and Magical Creatures by Stephen Krensky and Pham Quang Phuc

The Fabled Stables: Trouble with Tattle-Tails by Jonathan Auxier and Olga Demidova

The Lunch Club: The Curse of the Scarewolf by Dom Pelletier

ParaNorthern and the Chaos Bunny A-hop-calypse by Stephanie Cooke and Mari Costa

Images

  • The Book of Mythical Beasts and Magical Creatures by Stephen Krensky and Pham Quang Phuc

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Mythical Creature Quiz PPT (PowerPoint presentation)

Mythical Creature Quiz: Participant Sheet

Mythical Creature Quiz: Answer Sheet

Full activity PDF

Paper Boats

Craft

Ages 3-5

30-45 minutes

Paper Boats

Description

Participants will fold a paper boat and decorate it

Space Considerations

Any indoor space with tables and chairs for participants to do a craft

Competencies

  • Artistic expression
  • Creative and imaginative thinking
  • Development of fine motor skills
  • Eye-hand coordination
  • Following directions

Materials

  • 8.5 x 11 white or coloured paper
  • Crayons, pencil crayons or markers
  • Stickers (any kind)

Preparation

  • Pre-fold first two steps for some of the participants

Implementation

1. Fold sheet of paper in half, from top to bottom.

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2. With the fold at the top, fold the sheet in half a second time, this time left to right, and then unfold. This will create a vertical crease down the centre.

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3. Take the top-right corner and fold it to the centre crease. Then do the same with the top-left corner. It should look like a tent with extra paper underneath.

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4. Fold the first layer of extra paper up as far as it can go without ripping, and then flip the paper over and do the same on the other side. It should now look like a sailor hat.

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5. Put one hand inside the pocket and pull up the centre to widen the gap. You will notice that sides will automatically move closer together. Turn the paper so that the left corner is now at the centre of the bottom.

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6. Flatten the figure and press the paper down so it points to the right, and then fold the bottom point of the first flap up to the top point.

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7. Fold the flap up, and then turn the figure over and do the same on the other side.

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8. This step is similar to step 5. Put your hand inside the pocket and lift the top of the figure.

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9. Flatten the figure and pull both the left and the right side outward.

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10. Flatten the item, then pop the sides open to reveal the boat. Decorate boat as desired.

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Accessibility Considerations

  • Use larger sheets of paper if possible
  • Printable instructions will be provided
  • Have extra sheets on hand for participants who finish quickly and would like to make an additional one
  • Include volunteers or encourage partners to help with the activity

Book Suggestions

Lalani of the Distant Sea by Erin Entrada Kelly and Lian Cho

The Magic Boat by Kate Pearson, Katherine Farris and Gabrielle Grimard

The Paper Boat: A Refugee Story by Thao Lam

Images

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Paper Boat Instructions PDF

Full activity PDF

Paper Roll Dragon

Craft

Ages 6-8

30-60 minutes

Paper Roll Dragon

Description

Participants will create a paper dragon. It can also be used as a hand puppet or an arm puppet.

Space Considerations

Any indoor space where participants can do crafts at tables and chairs

Competencies

  • Development of fine motor skills
  • Eye-hand coordination
  • Following directions
  • Spatial relationships
  • Understanding shapes

Materials

  • Card stock
  • Pompoms (two different sizes)
  • Googly eyes
  • Tissue paper (if possible, in red, orange and yellow)
  • Tape
  • Glue sticks or wet glue
  • Scissors

Preparation

  • Consider pre-cutting tissue paper strips

Implementation

1. Add tape on opposite ends and sides of an 8.5 x 11 piece of card stock. Left side: tape facing up attached to the bottom of the paper. Right side: tape facing down attached to the top of the paper.

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2. Roll the paper, attaching the tape on both sides to secure the paper roll.

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3. Using a glue stick or wet glue, attach the large pompoms on one side with googly eyes, and then add the smaller pompoms on the other side for the nostrils.

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4. Cut folded strips of tissue paper and cut the unfolded ends either in a V shape (yellow and red examples), or cut the first layer diagonally and the second layer the opposite direction (orange example). The strips do not have to be perfectly straight.

If you have red, orange and yellow tissue, it will look more like flames. If not, feel free to use whatever colour(s) you have.

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5. Add tape to the folded side of the strips, and attach the sticky side inside the dragon’s mouth.

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6. If you are using different-coloured tissue paper strips, alternate them.

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7. Continue until you have attached strips throughout the whole mouth.

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Accessibility Considerations

  • Use large glue sticks and larger sheets of card stock
  • Pre-cut tissue paper flames
  • Have pre-assembled paper rolls without eyes and nostrils on hand

Book Suggestions

Amy Wu and the Patchwork Dragon by Kat Zhang and Charlene Chua

Call of the Sound Dragon (Dragon Masters #16) by Tracey West and Matt Loveridge

Once Upon a Dragon’s Fire by Beatrice Blue

Pierre & Paul: Dragon! by Caroline Adderson and Alice Carter

The Dragon in the Library by Louie Stowell and Davide Ortu

The Dragon Who Didn’t Like Fire by Gemma Merino

Images

Example of completed dragons

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Paper roll dragon instructions PDF

Paper roll dragon sample images PDF

Full activity PDF

Perch of Perception

Short Activity

Ages 9-12

10-15 minutes

Perch of Perception

Description

A memory game with an Indigenous tie-in that can be played in a number of different ways

Number of Participants

For any number of participants

Space Considerations

This program can be done indoors (access to a computer and projector is optional) or outdoors

Competencies

  • Classification skills
  • Memory
  • Study of nature

Materials

  • Computer with projector (optional)
  • A variety of small objects collected outside (leaves, twigs, sticks, flowers, etc.)
  • A variety of small objects from inside (pencils, paper clips, cards, toys, keys, etc.)
  • Pencils or pens
  • Paper
  • Sheet or blanket to cover items

Implementation

This activity has been adapted from an idea entitled “Perch of Perception” from The Learning Circle: Classroom Activities on First Nations in Canada.

In order to survive life on the land, First Nations needed to be aware of everything around them, from weather changes to animal activity. This activity emphasizes the First Nations values of seeing the world as fully as we can, as a way of appreciating, respecting and learning more about our world.

1. If playing the game indoors without a computer:

a.    Staff place a variety of small items (5–20) on a table or shelf, and cover them up with a sheet or blanket

b.    Instruct participants that they are to observe and attempt to remember as many of the objects as they can when the cover is removed

c.    Remove the cover and allow participants to view the objects for a set amount of time (one minute may be suitable)

d.    Cover the objects again

e.    Participants then write down as many of the objects as they can remember

f.     When the lists are complete, remove the cover again, and have students compare their lists to the objects; how many were they able to remember?

g.    You can repeat this as many times as needed, perhaps starting with a smaller amount of objects during the first game and then changing and increasing the number of objects for subsequent games

2. If playing the game indoors with a computer and projector:

a.    Download the Perch of Perception PowerPoint presentation

b.    Distribute paper and pencils

c.    Leave the slide image of the first tray on the screen for a suitable amount of time for your participants (a minimum of one minute is recommended)

d.    Flip to the next slide, and encourage participants to write down as many of the items as they remember; once participants have done this, go back to the previous slide to compare their answers to the items on the slide

e.    Repeat steps c and d for the following two slide images, which contain more items to remember; you may want to leave these slides on the screen for a longer period of time

3. If playing the game outdoors:

a.    Staff may collect outdoor items to create a display of items for participants to remember by uncovering them for a set amount of time; alternatively, staff can encourage participants to collect their own items to create their own displays

Accessibility Considerations

  • For kids with low or no vision, say each of the items out loud slowly; participants can try to remember what was said at the end
  • The game should not be framed as a competition with winners and losers (i.e. this person remembered the most items); instead, kids can just try their best to remember as many items as they can
  • Offer a variety of writing instruments for kids to jot down what they remember
  • Allow kids to touch the physical objects to help in remembering
  • Allow kids to work in pairs or small teams if desired

Book Suggestions

Meet Your Family = Gikenim Giniigi'igoog by David Bouchard and Kristy Cameron

The Origin of Day and Night by Paula Ikuutaq Rumbolt and Lenny Lishchenko

We Learn from the Sun by David Bouchard and Kristy Cameron

Full Activity PDF

Perch of Perception PowerPoint presentation

Picture Stories

Short Activity

Ages 9-12

15-30 minutes

Picture Stories

Description

Write your very own story that incorporates pictures to replace some text

Number of Participants

For any number of participants

Space Considerations

Any type of space where participants can be seated to write a story by hand, or a space with access to a computer to type a story

Competencies

  • Computer literacy (if typing the stories)
  • Creative and imaginative thinking
  • Organization and planning
  • Written communication skills

Materials

  • Paper
  • Pencils with erasers
  • Pencil crayons
  • Printouts of the story pictures template
  • Cut-out pictures from discarded magazines, newspapers, flyers, etc. (optional)
  • Glue
  • Scissors (staff use only)

Preparation

  • Prepare the room for a program that uses glue
  • If desired, cut out pictures from discarded magazines, newspapers, flyers, etc. for kids to incorporate into their written stories

Implementation

You can try this activity with participants writing their stories or typing them on a computer.

If writing with pencil and paper:

  1. Distribute a pencil, sheet of paper, glue sticks and pencil crayons to each participant.
  2. On a table, display the cut-out pictures from the story pictures template and from discarded magazines, newspapers, flyers, etc. Depending on the size of your group, you may want to cut out multiple story picture template pages so that all participants will have enough pictures to choose from. Participants can select pictures before writing their story, but they can also return to the table to select more pictures as their stories take shape.
  3. Encourage kids to plan their stories before writing. The stories should include not only text but also pictures that they glue down to replace a word.
  4. Encourage kids to experiment with writing out various types of font, similar to Geronimo Stilton and Thea Stilton stories. For example, the word “explode” can be a larger, more distinct lettering or in a different colour.
  5. Once the stories are complete, participants can trade them with others and attempt to read them aloud, swapping in an appropriate word every time they come to a picture.

If typing on the computer:

  1. Download the Word document of the story pictures template, and have these available on each computer.
  2. Open a new blank document.
  3. Kids can begin typing their stories, and copying and pasting a picture into the story.
  4. Tip: Staff may need to demonstrate how to get pictures to line up with the text if using Microsoft Word. Click on a picture, click the Format tab, click Wrap Text, and then select In Line with Text. To re-size a picture, click on it, and then drag the image from a corner to make it smaller or larger.
  5. It is recommended to use large spacing between the lines (double or triple-spacing) so there is enough room for the pictures.
  6. Once the stories are complete, participants can trade them with others and attempt to read them aloud, swapping in an appropriate word every time they come to a picture. They can do this by switching computers, or saving and then sending the stories by email.

Accessibility Considerations

  • Offer larger glue sticks for affixing the images to the paper, and offer assistance as needed
  • Offer a variety of writing instruments for participants to write their stories
  • If available, offer participants an accessible computer space with a mouse and a larger screen; they can write their story on the computer and select online images to add to the story
  • Read and print the instructions for this activity
  • Read completed stories aloud for all participants to hear; if necessary, use a microphone for larger crowds
  • Give participants the option to work on their stories in pairs or small groups

Book Suggestions

The Battle for the Crystal Castle (Geronimo Stilton and the Kingdom of Fantasy #13) by Geronimo Stilton

The Legend of the Maze (Thea Stilton and the Treasure Seekers #3) by Thea Stilton

Treasury of Magical Tales from Around the World by Donna Jo Napoli and Christina Balit

Full Activity PDF

Story pictures template in PDF

Story pictures template in Word

Pool Noodle Word Finder

Craft

Ages 6-8

30-60 minutes

Pool Noodle Word Finder

Description

Participants will create their own pool noodle word finder and use it to generate words

Space Considerations

Any space where participants can sit at tables and chairs

Competencies

  • Development of fine motor skills
  • Eye-hand coordination
  • Letter recognition
  • Logic and sequencing
  • Vocabulary building

Materials

  • Pool noodle*
  • Long wooden dowel, stir stick or similar tool*
  • Large alphabet stickers or foam alphabet stickers*
  • Permanent markers
  • Paper
  • Pencils or markers
  • Scissors or knives (adult use only)
  • Cutting board (adult use only)

*While shopping for material, make sure you compare the sizes of your pool noodle, wooden dowel or tool, and alphabet or foam alphabet stickers, to make sure they are compatible.

Preparation

  1. For each set of word finders, compare wooden dowel (or similar tool) to pool noodle and mark the three sections to make rings of equal length. The length should not exceed the length of the dowel.
  2. Cut the last marked section using the edge of a knife or scissors on a cutting board, leaving the pool noodle long enough for your activity, with two marks left.
  3. 2.   For pre-cut sets, cut marked areas using a knife or scissors on a cutting board.

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Implementation

  1. Give each participant or group a pool noodle with marked areas for cutting.
  2. Adult participants will cut pool noodle into three pieces according to the marked areas using a knife or scissors on a cutting board, and insert a wooden dowel or tool through the hole in the centre.
  3. Decide what letters you would like to put on the noodle rings (either horizontally or vertically), and space them out.

o   For three-letter words, we recommend using consonants for the first and third rings, and vowels for the second ring.

o   For large-size letters, we recommend three letters per ring.

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4. Rotate rings to form various words, and write them down on a piece of paper. See how many words you can find.

o   Option #1: Three-letter words can only be formed horizontally or vertically in order

o   Option #2: Three-letter words can be formed with scrambled letters out of order

o   Option #3: Words of any length can be formed with any letters on the rings

 

Accessibility Considerations

  • Cut noodle rings into medium size
  • Ensure the letter are as large as possible and also spaced out
  • Use foam letters
  • If writing on foam rings, use capital letters

Book Suggestions

Grandmother School by Rina Singh and Ellen Rooney

When Stars Are Scattered by Victoria Jamieson and Omar Mohamed

Images

Pool noodle word finder examples

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Pool noodle word finder instructions PDF

Full activity PDF

Puzzle and Challenge Printables

Short Activity

Ages 9-12

5-35 minutes

Puzzle and Challenge Printables

Description

A series of puzzles and challenges, including a word search, crossword puzzle, silly story, silhouette guessing game, tongue twisters and colouring sheet

Space Considerations

Any type of space where participants can be seated to do a worksheet

Competencies

  • Creative and imaginative thinking
  • Following directions
  • Written communication skills

Materials

  • Printouts of the puzzle and challenge worksheets
  • Pencils or pens
  • Crayons, pencil crayons or markers

Implementation

These worksheets can be included as part of a scheduled program or be used as a passive activity in which you leave the printouts out for kids to complete at any time. You can also post these printable worksheets on your library’s social media platforms for parents and caregivers to download, or you can distribute them with grab-and-go bags.

Print the desired number of worksheets:

Instructions: Participants search for and circle the mythical creatures in the jumble of letters. The words may appear horizontally, vertically, diagonally or backwards.

Instructions: Participants read the numbered clues and write the answer in the spot marked by that number in the crossword puzzle. Clues are marked as either across or down.

Instructions: This worksheet should be printed double-sided. Participants fill in words based on the prompts on the first side of the sheet. Next, they flip the page over and write their word choices in the corresponding boxes and then read the story. This activity can be done individually or in pairs.

Instructions: Try to guess the silhouettes of the book characters. The answers are provided upside-down at the bottom of the worksheet.

Instructions: Kids try to say these tongue twisters, and the faster they try to say them, the harder it gets! The tongue twisters can be read aloud by one person for another person to try.

Instructions: Colour the images on the worksheet.

Accessibility Considerations

  • The worksheets contain large font wherever possible
  • We have included a variety of worksheet options so staff and participants can pick whatever is most appealing and/or suitable for them
  • Kids can be encouraged to work in teams if desired; for example, while working on the crossword puzzle, it is not necessary for all participants to write, but everyone can contribute guesses to the clues
  • Consider using the tongue twisters as an alternative for children who may have difficulty with completing pencil-and-paper worksheets; the tongue twisters can be read aloud a single time slowly by one person, for another person to try multiple times quickly

Book Suggestions

Brothers Grimm: The Most Beloved Fairy Tales by Jacob Grimm, Wilhelm Grimm and Manuela Adreani

Myths and Legends of the World by Alli Brydon and Julia Iredale

The Book of Mythical Beasts and Magical Creatures by Stephen Krensky and Pham Quang Phuc

The Fabled Life of Aesop by Ian Lendler and Pamela Zagarenski

The Singing Rock & Other Brand-New Fairy Tales by Nathaniel Lachenmeyer and Simini Blocker

Full Activity PDF

Mythical Creatures Word Search

Fairy Tale Crossword Puzzle

Silly Story

Storytime Silhouettes

Tongue Twisters

Colouring Activity

Random Storytelling Game

Short Activity

Ages 6-8

20-30 minutes

Random Storytelling Game

Description

Participants will roll a character dice and a setting or object dice to begin a story. The first participant starts the story with a sentence, then the next participant adds a sentence, the next person does the same, and so on.

To be inclusive, use generic characters rather than specific ones. Remember, not all kids are familiar with European mainstream fairy tales.

Space Considerations

Any space where participants can sit in a circle on chairs or on the floor

Competencies

  • Creative and imaginative thinking
  • Logic and sequencing
  • Memory
  • Oral communication skills
  • Working collaboratively

Materials

  • Dice template
  • Pencils or pencil crayons (optional)
  • Markers (optional)
  • Paper (optional)

Preparation

  • Staff create storytelling dice for this activity by adding images and text, or just text, to the dice templates
  • Optionally, you can add the element of making storytelling dice to your program by allowing participants to make their own and then playing the random storytelling game

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  • Print out extra blank dice templates for participants to take home

Implementation

Random storytelling game:

  1. Participants sit in a circle
  2. The first participant rolls two dice and begins the story based on what is rolled
  3. The next player continues the story, and so on
  4. Once the story is completed, the second participant rolls and begins a new story

Options for creating storytelling dice:

  • Smaller storytelling circles can be formed
  • Participants can design their own dice using blank templates
  • Participants can take their own blank templates to make their own dice at home
  • Paper can be provided for participants who would prefer to write stories down rather than do oral storytelling
  • Paper can be provided to do a written version of this activity

Accessibility Considerations

  • Blank dice templates are provided for both 8.5” x 11” and 8.5” x 14” to customize with text only or images with text
    o If using images, please identify image with text as well (castle card: image of castle + “castle” in text)
  • Dice text should consist of only one or two words per side and one image per side
  • Instead of dice, use one of the following options:
    o Cards: Create a set of six cards for characters and six cards for settings or objects; players randomly draw a card from both piles each turn to determine their character and setting or object
    o Bag and items: Find items (toys, pictures, etc.) for characters and settings or objects; put them in two separate bags, and players will choose an item from each bag to start their story

Book Suggestions

Brothers Grimm: The Most Beloved Fairy Tales by Jacob Grimm, Wilhelm Grimm and Manuela Adreani

Forgotten Fairy Tales of Kindness and Courage by Mary Sebag-Montefiore, Josy Bloggs, Maribel Luchuga, Maxine Lee-Mackie and Khoa Le

Indonesian Children’s Favorite Stories: Fables, Myths and Fairy Tales by Joan Suyenaga and Salim Martowiredjo

Myths and Legends of the World by Alli Brydon and Julia Iredale

Images

  • Dice template and example

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Random storytelling game: dice template DOCX

Random storytelling game: dice examples DOCX

Full activity PDF

Real-Life Fairy-Tale Animals

Short Activity

Ages 0-5

10 minutes

Real-Life Fairy-Tale Animals

Description

Participants attempt to match fairy-tale characters with pictures of real-life animals. Then staff play animal sounds, and participants attempt to guess which animals made those sounds.

Number of Participants

For any number of participants

Space Considerations

An indoor space where participants can be seated to complete a worksheet and then listen to sounds that are playing from a speaker or computer

Competencies

  • Classification skills
  • Following directions
  • Understanding and appreciation of animals

Materials

  • Sound-guessing MP3 file downloads (links below)
  • Printouts of the real-life fairy-tale animal sheet (one per participant)
  • Speaker or computer
  • Pencils or crayons

Implementation

  1. Distribute the real-life fairy-tale animal sheet and a pencil or crayon
  2. Participants can start by using a pencil or crayon to match the cartoon fairy-tale character on the left side of the page with a picture of the real-life animal on the right side of the page
  3. On the second page of the sheet, pictures of six animals that feature in various fairy tales are included; explain that the sounds that will play will be from real-life animals, and participants will attempt to match the sound to the correct animal
  4. Start by playing the first sound on a speaker, and ask participants (with parent and caregiver assistance as needed) to point to the image that they think matches the sound, or verbally say it
  5. Continue playing until you have played all of the sounds

Accessibility Considerations

  • Large, clear images and text are used on the chart of images
  • Allow participants to guess the animal sound verbally or by pointing to the sheet
  • Play the sounds on an appropriate speaker or computer for the space and number of participants; test the speaker or computer from multiple locations before the program
  • Play each sound multiple times as needed

Book Suggestions

Come, Read with Me by Margriet Ruurs and Christine Wei

I Am Scary by Elise Gravel

Princesses Versus Dinosaurs by Linda Bailey and Joy Ang

Animal Sound 1: Goat MP3

Animal Sound 2: Frog MP3

Animal Sound 3: Wolf MP3

Animal Sound 4: Chicken MP3

Animal Sound 5: Bear MP3

Animal Sound 6: Pig MP3

Full Activity PDF

Stone Soup Activity

Long Activity

Ages 0-3

30-45 minutes

Stone Soup Activity

Description

The stone soup activity consists of three parts:

  • reading the story “Stone Soup”
    *it can be borrowed from a local library or the CELA library (https://celalibrary.ca/)
  • Matching card game
  • I Have, Who Has card game

Space Considerations

Any indoor space where participants can play card games, either with tables and chairs or on the ground

Competencies

  • Classification skills
  • Eye-hand coordination
  • Memory
  • Oral communication skills
  • Working collaboratively

Materials

  • Card stock (for preparation only)
  • Scissors (for preparation only) (adult use only)
  • Stone soup book, audiobook or e-audiobook
  • Several versions of “Stone Soup” for display
  • Stone soup matching cards (24 cards)
  • Stone soup I Have, Who Has cards (12 cards)

Preparation

  • Print out game cards on card stock (according to how many groups you will have)
    *Consider having one or two extra sets on hand if possible
  • Cut out game cards
  • Give each group a deck of the game cards

Implementation

Reading the Story

Read “Stone Soup,” which can be borrowed from a local library or the CELA library (https://celalibrary.ca/). There are various versions, and any will do.

Alternatively, you can use an audiobook or an e-audiobook and have the same hard-copy versions available for participants to follow along.

Explain that every stone soup recipe is different before playing the games.

How to Play Matching Card Game

Goal: Match all of the cards together as a team by taking turns. You can divide participants into smaller groups and give each group a deck of matching cards.

Note: There are 24 cards in total, but you can use fewer cards as long as you have two of each image in play. For example, you can use 12 cards instead.

  1. Ensure that each card has a duplicate in your deck, regardless of how many cards the participants play with
  2. Mix cards together face down
  3. Place cards on the table or the ground face down in a few rows and columns: for 24 cards, 4 rows of 6; for 12 cards, 4 rows of 3
  4. Player 1 starts by turning over two cards
    o If they match, Player 1 puts the cards aside and turns over another two cards
    o If they do not match, both cards get turned over again in the same place, and Player 2 turns over two cards
    o A player may turn over a card in play that a previous player has turned over
  5. Play ends when all cards have been matched

How to Play I Have, Who Has Game

Goal: Put all 12 cards in logical order. All cards must be played in this game. You can divide participants into smaller groups and give each group a deck of I Have, Who Has cards.

  1. Mix all 12 cards together face down
  2. Give players cards
  3. The order of play is determined by the cards
  4. Player 1 will read out “I have a fire, who has a pot” card and place it down
  5. Player 2 will read out “I have a pot, who has water” card and place it down
  6. Player 3 will go next, and so on until the last card with an empty bowl is read

Accessibility Considerations

  • Cards will have both images and large text
  • Use glue to outline images on the card, to make it more tactile

Matching Game

  • A participant with a disability may:
    o point at a card or identify the card (for example, Row 1, Card 3) and have a partner turn it over
    o pick up and show their card, and a partner may read it out aloud

I Have, Who Has Game

  • Use toys or props with the cards:
    o If you have a toy kitchen or food set, you can use these for the I Have, Who Has game with the cards to make it more tactile
    o You can also create your own props using foam, felt, clay or other materials
    *Set items in the centre, and players will read their cards and reach for the item they have, holding it up for others to see
  • A participant with a disability may:
    o work with a partner who can read the I Have, Who Has cards aloud
    o work with a partner who may also assist in holding the card up

Book Suggestions

Journey of the Midnight Sun by Shazia Afzal and Aliya Ghare

Meg and Greg: The Bake Sale by Elspeth Rae, Rowena Rae and Elisa Gutiérrez

Out Into the Big Wide Lake by Paul Harbridge and Josée Bisaillon

Images

Game card samples: full sets in download links

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How to play stone soup card games PDF (2 pages)

Stone soup matching game cards PDF (24 cards, 4 pages)

I Have, Who Has game cards PDF (12 cards, 3 pages)

Full activity PDF

Summer Scavenger Hunt

Long Activity

Ages 3-5

30-45 minutes

Summer Scavenger Hunt

Description

This is a printable activity prompting kids to go outside with a parent or caregiver and use their senses. A blank template will be provided in Word format so that libraries or participants can customize the scavenger hunt.

Space Considerations

An outdoor natural space like a park or backyard or similar space

Competencies

  • Body awareness
  • Classification skills
  • Following directions
  • Sensory motor skills
  • Study of nature

Materials

  • Card stock (for preparation only)
  • Pencils
  • Summer scavenger hunt handout

Preparation

  • Print out Summer scavenger hunt handout (filled out or blank, or double-sided with one side filled out and the other side not filled out)
  • Provide pencils for participants to mark off boxes

Implementation

  1. Read handout
  2. Go to an outdoor natural space with an adult
  3. Fill out handout

Accessibility Considerations

A Word document template is provided to customize the scavenger hunt.

  • Option #1: Leave boxes blank for participants to fill out themselves
  • Option #2: Template can be totally customized for what staff select
  • Option #3: Do both activities (filled out and not filled out)
  • Option #4: One activity can be done and the other can be a take-home/take-away activity at the participants’ own pace

Book Suggestions

Upside-Down Magic: Night Owl by Sarah Mlynowski, Lauren Myracle and Emily Jenkins

We Learn from the Sun by David Bouchard and Kristy Cameron

Wildflower by Briana Corr Scott

Images

Game card samples: full sets in download links

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Summer scavenger hunt handouts PDF (filled and blank, 2 pages)

Blank summer scavenger hunt handout DOCX (for customization, 1 page)

Full activity PDF

The Emperor's New Clothes

Craft

Ages 3-5

15 minutes

The Emperor's New Clothes

Description

Make a craft, using a file folder, that contrasts the emperor in his clothes and in his underwear

Space Considerations

Any type of space where participants can be seated to do a craft

Competencies

  • Artistic expression
  • Creative and imaginative thinking

Materials

  • Printouts of the emperor templates
  • Scissors (adult use only)
  • Crayons, pencil crayons or markers
  • Glue
  • File folders (one per participant); can be previously used
  • Tactile items including foam shapes and cut clothes from fabric, to decorate the emperor

Preparation

  • Prepare the room for a program that uses glue
  • If desired, pre-cut the emperor’s head and feet, or allow parents and caregivers to assist with this step

Implementation

1. Distribute the printouts of the emperor templates, file folders, glue, and crayons, pencil crayons or markers.

2. Participants colour all of the templates and add tactile items as desired.

3. Glue the base of the head to the top and back of the file folder, with the head facing forward and sticking out above the top of the folder.

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4. Glue the feet to the bottom and back of the file folder, with the feet facing forward and sticking out below the bottom of the folder.

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5. Glue the emperor’s clothed body to the front of the folder.

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6. Glue the emperor in his underwear on the inside of the folder.

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7. Open (and close) the folder to see the emperor in his underwear. How embarrassing!

Accessibility Considerations

  • Offer kids a variety of instruments to colour their image, and encourage them to choose what they feel most comfortable with
  • Pre-cut the head and feet templates
  • Offer a few tactile items (e.g. foam shapes, cut-out clothes from fabric) to decorate the emperor’s clothes

Book Suggestions

I Am Scary by Elise Gravel

Read to Your Toddler Every Day: 20 Folktales to Read Aloud by Lucy Brownridge and Chloe Giordano

Full activity PDF

Emperor templates

Wanted Poster

Short Activity

Ages 6-8

10 minutes

Wanted Poster

Description

Follow the descriptions closely in order to draw a creature

Space Considerations

Indoor space where participants can complete a worksheet

Competencies

  • Artistic expression
  • Following directions
  • Organization and planning
  • Reading comprehension

Materials

  • Pencils
  • Erasers
  • Crayons, pencil crayons or markers

Implementation

  1. Print and distribute the Wanted poster template to each participant
  2. Distribute pencils, erasers, and crayons, pencil crayons or markers
  3. Encourage participants to read the entire description of the creature before beginning to draw, in order to best plan out space requirements and other details

Accessibility Considerations

  • The template uses large, sans serif font, which is easier for kids with dyslexia
  • Give participants the option to work in pairs or alone
  • Offer kids a variety of instruments to draw and colour their image, and encourage them to choose what they feel most comfortable with

Book Suggestions

The Barnabus Project by Terry Fan, Eric Fan and Devin Fan

The Dragon in the Library by Louie Stowell and Davide Ortu

The Girl and the Wolf by Katherena Vermette and Julie Flett

This Is the Path the Wolf Took by Laura Farina and Elina Ellis

Wanted poster template

Full Activity PDF

Images and Templates

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What Time is it, Mountain?

Short Activity

Ages 3-5

20-30 minutes

What Time is it, Mountain?

Description

During ancient times, in some East Asian countries such as China, Japan and Korea, people would divide a day into 12 two-hour periods and assign a zodiac animal to each period.

What Time Is It, Mountain? is a new, original game based on the game What Time Is It, Mr. Wolf, with added features like a 24-hour clock, zodiac animal hours and animal movements.

Space Considerations

Any large space free of obstacles where kids can move from one end to the other

Competencies

  • Body awareness
  • Creative expression
  • Following directions
  • Oral communication skills
  • Strategic thinking

Materials

  • Card stock
  • Masking or painter’s tape

Preparation

  • Ensure boundaries of space are marked
  • Print out several copies of the Mountain player’s handout
  • Mark start line and finish line on the floor or ground with masking or painter’s tape
  • Print out extra blank dice templates for participants to take home

Implementation

How to play

  1. One player is assigned the role of “Mountain”
  2. The Mountain player stands far away, with back turned away from other players
  3. A marker is placed in the vicinity of the mountain that the kids need to reach in order to win (to discourage physical contact with the Mountain player)
  4. The Mountain player has a clock with divisions assigned to zodiac animals

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Each round

  1. Kids will ask, “What time is it, Mountain?”
  2. Mountain will tell them the time, the year and count the number aloud: “It’s 2 a.m., the Year of the Rat! 1-2”
  3. Once Mountain says the name of the year and begins to count, kids will creep toward the mountain, mimicking the movement of the animal that is called out
  4. After counting, Mountain quickly turns around, and the kids must freeze
  5. Any kids that move have to sit in the spot where they are standing
  6. Mountain turns around again, and the next round begins, and so on
  7. The first kid to reach the finish line before Mountain turns around yells, “It’s New Year!”

Examples of rounds

Kids: What time is it, Mountain?

Mountain: It’s 11 p.m., the Year of the Rat! 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10-11

Kids: What time is it, Mountain?

Mountain: It’s 2 p.m., the Year of the Sheep! 1-2

Kids: What time is it, Mountain?

Mountain: It’s 10 a.m., the Year of the Snake! 1-2-3-4 …

Closest player: It’s New Year!

Accessibility Considerations

  • The zodiac chart and the zodiac clock will be enlarged on the Mountain player’s handout
  • The zodiac chart (and clock) can be posted or redrawn on chart paper or written out on a white board for the other participants to see
  • Animal sounds can be substituted for or used with animal movements
  • Encourage the Mountain player to speak loudly and count slowly
  • Elimination can be removed, and the focus can just be on moving toward the finish line
  • Offer the option to play with a buddy

Book Suggestions

Indonesian Children's Favorite Stories: Fables, Myths and Fairy Tales by Joan Suyenaga and Salim Martowiredjo

Once Upon an Hour by Ann Yu-Kyung Choi and Soyeon Kim

Treasury of Magical Tales from Around the World by Donna Jo Napoli and Christina Balit

Images

  • Game set-up
  • Mountain player's handout

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Mountain player’s handout DOCX

Full activity PDF

Wild Creature Flip Book

Craft

Ages 9-12

15-20 minutes

Wild Creature Flip Book

Description

Create a wild creature flip book

Number of Participants

For a minimum of two participants

Space Considerations

Any type of space where participants can be seated to do a craft

Competencies

  • Artistic expression
  • Creative and imaginative thinking

Materials

  • Paper (card stock preferred)
  • Printouts of the Wild creature flip book template, one per participant
  • Pencils
  • Crayons, pencil crayons or markers
  • Binder
  • Scissors (staff use only)
  • Three-hole punch (staff use only)

Implementation

1.   You may choose to run this as part of a library program or allow children to create their drawing outside of program time (passive programming), where they can complete a drawing and hand it in to staff at any time.

2.   Print out one Wild creature flip book template for each participant in the program, or print out a stack of templates to be used for passive programming.

3.   Participants use the template to draw a creature, following these general guidelines:

a.    Head and neck in top section, above first dotted line

b.    Body, including arms and hands (and/or wings/fins), in middle section, between dotted lines

c.    Legs and feet (and/or tail) in bottom section, below second dotted line

Kids can be creative in their drawing. For example, their creature can have more than one head or a mermaid’s tail instead of legs.

4.   Kids hand their drawing to staff.

5.   Staff use a three-hole punch on the left side of each sheet. There should be one hole in each of the three sections.

6.   Staff cut along the dotted lines to separate the creature into three sections. Add the sections to the binder with the top section going in the top ring of the binder, the middle section in the middle ring, and the bottom section in the bottom ring.

7.   Once several creatures have been added, kids can view the binder and mix and match sections to make a variety of creatures. If desired, you can label the binder and leave it out for kids to access outside of program time.

Accessibility Considerations

  • Offer kids a variety of instruments to draw and colour their image, and encourage them to choose what they feel most comfortable with
  • Allow participants to work in pairs or small groups as desired
  • Only staff should be using the scissors and the three-hole punch

Book Suggestions

Death & Sparkles by Rob Justus

Tales from Beyond the Brain by Jeff Szpirglas and Steven P. Hughes

The Fabled Stables: Trouble with Tattle-Tails by Jonathan Auxier and Olga Demidova

The Lunch Club: The Curse of the Scarewolf by Dom Pelletier

Wild creature flip book template

Full Activity PDF

Images

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